Drool Cloth Tutorial #droolcloth #sewing #specialneeds

Drool Cloth Tutorial #droolcloth #sewing #specialneeds


Hey, it’s Diana from Beccabug.com. Today
we’re going to sew drool cloths on a tether. This is another wheelchair
accessory I cannot live without. For more patterns of other awesome accessories,
don’t forget to stop by Beccabug.com and hop over to my Etsy shop. Links below! I
am NOT a fan of bibs or bandannas. They catch the drool and just hold it there
soaking everything against the skin and they’re not very age-appropriate. Drool
cloths are really absorbent and they’re extra cute with a personality punch. Plus,
they can stretch to catch drips from G- tubes, wipe off drooly fingers and still
snap back to their place. I love that I can move it out of the way, or throw it
over the wheelchair handle to dry. Because when she’s concentrating or
leaning back a little, my daughter drools a little less. Because let’s be honest…
some drool is a drip here and there, some is pretty constant, but it is just
so much moisture. All the time. So much. These wash up great and they’re quick and
easy sew that you can make stacks and stacks of. Let’s get started! This is a
project where pre-shrinking is a must! Both towels (or terry cloth) and flannel
really shrink a lot, especially if you use a nice natural fiber like cotton. One
wash and dry is usually enough to get the most shrink out and they’ll pretty
much shrink at the same rate after that. When I am sewing stacks and stacks of
these, I cut the hems off the towel and then cut it into pieces using the whole
towel. For this tutorial, I went with cloths that are 12 inches by 16 inches.
They can really be any size, though. Cut the towel fabric and the flannel to the
same size. Lay them right sides together and sew around the edge, leaving a gap of
about 4 inches to turn it inside out when you’re done. I have found even with
the four cone serger, I end up not catching everything in the seam. Partly
because of the fluffiness of the fabric, and turning corners and stuff. So, I sew
these exclusively on my regular machine now with at least a 1/2 inch seam
allowance. I like to round my corners, but I also
did one with 90-degree corners by pivoting and either works great! After you turn it right-side out, the
next step is important. Don’t skip it! If you don’t top stitch more than once, they
pull apart and they’ll never lay properly ever again. Ask me how I know!
Top stitch around the edge, catching the edges of the hole you left for turning,
and then sew a second row of top stitching further into the middle. It
makes a big difference over the life of the cloth. Trust me! Or try it out for
yourself, skip the top stitching. You little rebel,
you! To prepare for the grommet, decide which
corner you want it to hang from. My daughter has the most dexterity in her
left hand and that’s the one that goes in her mouth whenever possible. She’ll
also occasionally grab the towel and brush her face with it. So, I set the
grommet so that when it lays over her left shoulder, the cute flannel shows. Cut
a small X in that corner and then cut the tips off of the triangles at the
inside of the X. Don’t cut this too big, as you want the grommet to fit snugly. To
set the grommet in, you’ll need the proper tool. Finish the grommet according
to package directions. Ta da! Your cloth’s all done!!
Let’s get that tether going! The tether is basically an open-ended scrunchie;
only out of tougher fabric and it keeps your new drool cloths from falling on the
germ infested ground or from dragging on dirty wheelchair wheels.
I finished my short edges first with colored thread and a decorative stitch.
And, I love a challenge, so I sewed mine right sides together and
turned it inside out. The stiff denim really makes it hard to turn inside out.
Spoiler alert! You could also press your edges in and
top stitch, if you don’t want bulging finger muscles, like me. For durability, I
sew my waistband elastic into a loop that equals the length I want my tether
to end up. Then, I put a carabiner through the loop,
aiming to get my stitched overlap somewhere in the middle of my open-ended
scrunchie, and thread the other end of the loop through the tether. Your tether is all done and ready to
keep your drool cloths right where you need them! I hope you enjoyed this
tutorial! I had a ton of fun making it! Leave me a comment below and let me know
how your drool cloths turned out. If you liked either of the t-shirts I wore in this
video, check out my t-shirt shop on Beccabug.com. Don’t forget to LIKE this video and
SUBSCRIBE to be in on more to come! Thanks for watching!!

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