Edible Thoughts Makes Episode 4: Lion Hearted Swoncho

Edible Thoughts Makes Episode 4: Lion Hearted Swoncho


[cheerful music] [Image focuses on the herringbone hem of a swoncho knit with a mottled gold grey cream brown yarn and coppery red brown yarn with avocado plant leaves in the foreground.] [Coral banner with white text “Edible Thoughts Makes Episode 4: Lion Hearted Swoncho” next to a white mug with a heart.] [Tan skin bespectacled Asian woman gets settled on a chair with a large scale houndstooth-patterned throw.] [Holds up swoncho to be discussed in video] [Picks up floral notebook to review notes] [music fades out] Hello and welcome to edible thoughts makes!
My name is Stephanie and this is my vlog where I share with your works in
progress, finished projects, things I’m cooking up, and books that I read.
Today I would like to share with you a test knit that I did in September, October. Today is November 13th and the pattern
is set to release probably by the end of the week or so I hear … but soon! [picks up swoncho to show] This is the lion-hearted swoncho. The
DK weight version by Tif Nielan. Tif goes by Tif Handknits on Ravelry and Tifnielan_handknits on Instagram. So you will find [cough] this pattern in a fingering weight version that’s already out. That pattern has been released already. and this is this DK weight version. DK
weight is probably my favorite weight to knit sweaters in. I feel like it knits up
much quickly, much more quickly compared to fingering weight and I like the weight of that sweater on myself I feel like it can have nice drape but there’s still a little bit of heftiness to it that you don’t get in fingering
weight sweaters though I love fingering weight sweaters too they just take a lot longer. So I wanted to share with you some techniques that you will learn if you
decide to make this and some things that are unique to this sweater slash poncho.
So it’s called a swoncho and a swoncho is a sweater plus poncho. So there’s a
very deep yoke which means your armpit doesn’t cut off here [cough] it cuts off lower
[one arm raised while other hand
points to armpit and then lower] [holds up swoncho neckline] You will see here the delightful herringbone in the neckline. So it was my first time knitting herringbone and it is so fun. It’s like
as you work it up after a couple rounds and you see it happening, it’s like magic!
It’s so much fun. I link to tutorials that I have used to learn the different
techniques in this pattern. There’s herringbone here at the bottom,
there’s a split hem so the back is a little longer than the front and that is
also herringbone. You will also do an icord bind off which is my first time
doing that and that was also much easier than I thought it was going to be and it looks really polished. Twisted ribbon in the cuffs.
I love how defined a ribbing looks with twisted ribbing. So that’s super fun! There is two stranded colorwork throughout and there’s color blocking in the sleeves The color work in that yoke, I feel like makes it really fun to keep going because you want to see what happens next. On mine you can see the colors
I chose melt together a little more so you don’t see the pattern as
distinctly. If you wanted it more distinct you could pick more contrasting
colors but I kind of wanted it to look more I guess cohesive or more like a
watercolor painting. In the pattern she gives you suggestions on picking your colors. She does say you need three distinct colors. She mentions for color
one you probably want it multi-color or variegated or I guess that’s what she
used in her sample. Color two should be a complementary color to the main at least
that’s what she used and then color three is a solid, ideally a tone that’s
present in color one. So that’s basically what I did. [opens bag of remaining yarn from swoncho] Here’s what I used for my
color one [holds up yarn cake]. See it’s a mottled assortment of cream gray gold and brown
…like autumn in a ball. [digs through bag] For my color two, I used a coppery
combination of reds and browns so that plays off with the browns and [holds up first yarn cake next to second color] color one. And then for my color three I used a [holds up all three yarns] warm gray and I think that would be called semi solid if it isn’t the complete solid gray throughout but kind
of varies a little bit So these are the three colors I used. The sweater is designed to be
worn with 2 to 6 inches of ease. The sizing is from 34.5 inches or
88 centimeters to 66.5 inches or 169 centimeters… that’s the finished bust circumference so then you want to take that number subtract how
much ease you want to see how that lines up with your bust circumference or take
your bust circumference and add 2 to 6 inches depending on how much easy you
want and then figure out which size you’re gonna make. She also gives you the
upper arm circumference in the finished body length. [putting on swoncho] The back hem is longer so that’s how I know that’s the back. It does wear a
little shorter because of the deep yoke the sides will pull up so I wouldn’t
wear this without a layer underneath you could do like a tank top or short
sleeves or right now I’m wearing kind of a tunic length cowl neck top but you’ll
see that the the length hits like right about my hip [turns to side] maybe longer.
So I made my sleeves really long because I wanted longer
sleeves and I wanted to be able to push them up which then pushes this armpit
length up more so that when I raise my arm my entire swoncho doesn’t go all the
way up like it does now so then if I wanted to roll my sleeves up and kind of
move that arm pit up more, it doesn’t move up as much
[moves arm up and down] [bottom hem of sweater
doesn’t move up with arm movement]
you see that? And then you can wear it so that you have a little more drape here on the front. I kind of like it
styled like that and then you have a little more arm movement but if you
wanted to wear it with the yoke spread out that’s really nice too and it’s all
smooth you just don’t have as much [raises arm and bottom hem of swoncho goes up] movement without it raising all the way
up. So I like that option. You can do a three-quarter length option. Yeah I really like it, it’s cozy it’s comfy it’s a great layering piece to put on over what I’m wearing or over a dress. You can dress it up
dress it down. I really really like it. So I really enjoy this swoncho. It was my
first time making a swoncho and the pattern like I said comes out soon. Today is
November 13. It should come out in the next few days or so. So keep a look out
for Tif Nielan on Instagram or on Ravelry. I’m sure
she’ll make an announcement and head on over and you can check out my notes on
my project page for the lion-hearted swoncho, the DK weight version. If you’d
like to check out some of my notes on that and some of the tutorials for the
different techniques before the pattern comes out. Thank you so much for watching
and listening I hope you have a wonderful day! [cheerful music fades in
and video goes to swoncho, not worn] [pans over i-cord bind off] [zooms in on twisted ribbing of cuff] [zooms in on herringbone neckline] [zooms out] [fades to beginning of herringbone
neckline on circular knitting needles] [short video clip in real-time knitting
one round of herringbone] [knit two through the back loops but only
remove one loop from the left needle] [image of herringbone hem with i-cord bind-off] [close-up of color-work] [completed swoncho yoke hanging
up with a green progress keeper
marking the front and sleeves sectioned off] [image of herringbone hems with out-of-focus avocado leaves in foreground] [close-up of tan skin woman modeling
finished swoncho] [tan skin bespectacled Asian woman with long dark brown hair wearing finished swoncho over a long eyelet-hemmed top in front of a yellow leafed tree] [same person smiling, with a handful of leaves] [leaves thrown in the air] [music fades out]

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