Heirloom Easter Dress Sewing Tutorial | Children’s Corner Jamie Pattern

Heirloom Easter Dress Sewing Tutorial | Children’s Corner Jamie Pattern


hey everyone, here is a simple little Easter
dress. I used the blocking pieces from Children’s Corner Jamie pattern and I will link all the
supplies down below. So I decided that I wanted to do a series
of pintucks on the front bodice of this dress. That meant that I cut an oversized piece of
fabric out and used a twin needle to make a bunch of pintucks. I have a detailed video
on this process that I’ll link below. It’s super easy.
Once I was done with the pintucks, then I cut out my bodice front. Of course, you can
skip these pintucks if you’d like… but regardless, you’ll have two bodice front
pieces, two pieces for the skirt (these are rectangles that are cut to whatever width
and length you desire), two sleeves, two bodice back pieces cut on the fold, and one strip
for the placket. I wanted some smocking on the top part of
the front skirt, so I ran my fabric through my pleater. I have a detailed video on how
to use pleaters that I’ll link below. I also have a video on how to pleat by dots
if you’d rather not invest in a pleater yet. Of course, you could just gather the
front of the dress instead of smocking. It’s sewing – you do you.
So to construct the bodice, you’ll have your two front pieces across from each other
and then your two back pieces across from each other. You’ll sew them together at
the shoulder seam in this formation with right sides together.
Once you iron open each of those seams, you can fold the back pieces onto themselves and
have the front pieces touch. This will leave you with a folded edge along the back and
a nice way to line the inside… more on that later in the video.
So at this point, you have a couple of options. If you’d like to simply sew the neckline
together and call it a day, you can sew from one back to the other back – not including
the lining part of the back. You’ll just go from one ironed part to the other ironed
part. Now I made things complicated on this one
since I wanted to add some lace. I guess you could’ve added the lace from one ironed
back to the other ironed back if you tucked in the ends of the lace so there wasn’t
a raw edge, but, like I said, I made it complicated. I cut down the ironed back of each of the
backs. This allowed me to put the lace in and not have to worry about the raw edges
of the lace. First I attached entredeux, which I have a detailed video on how to do this,
and then I attached lace, and again, I have a detailed video on how to do this. So then
I sewed from one back, across the neckline, and down the next back. This way the lace
and entredeux edges are concealed in seam. I’ve also done the method were you simply
tuck in the ends, and I like both for different reasons. Just depends on my mood. With this
method, the lace will kinda tapper down into the seam at the back, which doesn’t bother
me. But if you just tuck the ends and don’t cut down the back, then the lace will stand
up across the whole neckline. So… moving on from the complicated lace…
if you did pleat the front of your skirt, then you’ll want to pull out a few pleats
on each side to allow for a seam allowance. Then you can tie off one side of threads in
groups of twos or threes. I used my blocking board to measure and block
off the pleats. I’ll link this board down below. When I got the width for the skirt
correct, I tied off the other side of threads in groups of twos or threes. Then I ironed
on some freezer paper for added security when sewing – this stuff keeps your pleats in
place so they don’t move around on you when you sew. I added the freezer paper to the
wrong side of the fabric. I have a detailed video that I’ll link below.
So first I attached piping and I did this with the right side facing up. Remember, I
put the freezer paper on the wrong side of the fabric. This allows me to place the piping
next to the pleating line that I’d like and see what I’m doing as I sew.
So then I ripped the freezer paper off. And then sewed the bodice front to the skirt front
with right sides together. I did this with the skirt on top of the bodice so I could
see my previous stitches for the piping and sew right along them.
Thennn it was onto the skirt… and I’m back to do the continuous placket method.
Honestly, how I do the placket in the back depends greatly on my mood, but also, I tend
to do the continuous placket method when working on nicer garments, too. Still, my mood has
a great deal to do with this decision. Anywho, if you’d like to use that method, I have
a detailed video explaining that process. The jus is that you put your skirt back together
with the placket strip, right sides together, and sew with the strip on the bottom. You’ll
angle your skirt away from the placket as you get to the bottom of the slit. Lift your
pressure foot to adjust the gathers as needed. And the continue sewing, now bringing your
skirt fabric back to meet the placket fabric. Then run two rows of gather stitches along
the back sections. Next I cut two pieces of piping for the back sections. These are an
inch or so longer than the width of the bottom of the yoke back pieces. The extra inch or
so will fold around to the back side of the yoke pieces so the raw edge can kinda tuck
between the yoke back and the lining piece. The idea is once I hand sew the yoke lining
in place, you won’t b e able to see the raw edges. Of course, the raw edges on the
other end will be enclosed with the side French seam.
Then you can iron all of this so it lays nice and flat. Next I ironed the bottom edges of
the lining pieces up about half an inch. I like to save all of my hand sewing until the
end, so for now, I’m just going to turn up the lining edges and baste them in place
before I do the sleeves. Okay sleeves…. to begin, I ran two rows
of gather threads on the top and bottom of the sleeves. On the bottom, I start and stop
about one inch away from the edge. Then with the top of the sleeve, I run the gather threads
from the clip marking the front of the sleeve and stopping at the clips marking the back
of the sleeve. Then I gathered the bottom of the sleeve…
and now here is your choice with finishing that bottom edge of the sleeve. You can attach
a bias strip folded in half with the idea of hand sewing it later… as I’ve shown
in other videos. But since this is a fancier dress, I decided to first attach some entredeux
and then some lace. And again, I have videos explaining in detail how both of these processes
are done. In any case, once you are done finishing the
bottom of the sleeve, then you can gather the top of the sleeve until it fits the armhole
area. What I find is the easiest is to pin one end of the sleeve to the dress side and
then pin the other end of the sleeve to the other side of the dress. Then I pin the middle
of the sleeve to the shoulder seam and kinda adjust the in between space from there.
After you sew the sleeve in place, then you can trim up the seams and go back to your
machine and enclose those raw edges with a zigzag. You can use your serger instead if
you wish. Once that is complete, you’ll iron the seam towards the sleeve. Ironing
towards the sleeve helps to support the poof in a gathered sleeve like this.
Then I match up one side, making sure those folded edges of the lining pieces stay folded,
and take that to my machine to run a French seam down the side. I have a detailed video
on how to do French seams that I’ll link below.
Okay, here is another design choice, but I decided to attach lace to the bottom of the
dress. If you want to go this route, then you’ll want to do the lace now since you’ll
be able to enclose the raw edges of the lace in the other French seam.
So I zigzagged the lace from one end to the other end. Again, I have a detailed video
on how this is done if you aren’t familiar, everything is linked below.
Then I pressed the seam towards the dress. If you want to skip the lace, then you’ll
do the hem as I’ve shown in many of my other videos. Or… go ahead and do another embellishment.
It’s sewing, you do you. So finally, folded the skirt up and made a
series of tucks. I would measure one spot, put a pin, measure over and put another pin…
and then iron in between. I would do this all the way around.
I used my edge foot to help keep an even tuck. It isn’t necessary to use this foot to make
a tuck, but it is helpful. Once I had all the tucks that I liked, then
I joined the other side seam with a French seam.
And when I completed the smocking, hand embroidery work, and other hand finishings, here is my
finished garment. I used the 12 month size with the idea that 1) we are a few months
away from Easter and 2) I’d rather have the dress a little big than too small. Audrey
is kinda a thin baby since she’s tall, but average weight. She is 8 months old here,
28 inches long, and about 17.5 pounds. Anywho, I hope this was helpful. If you have
any questions, please leave them in the comments below and I’ll do my best to answer them.
As always, I appreciate y’all for watching and I hope to catch y’all next time.

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