How to make a New Year’s Cake with Champagne Buttercream | SUGAR PLUM SWEET TART

How to make a New Year’s Cake with Champagne Buttercream | SUGAR PLUM SWEET TART


Hello my Sugar Plum family! Welcome back to Sugar Plum Sweet Tart. Today I’m going to walk you through my New Year’s cake for
2020. This cake is made with vanilla layers and champagne meringue
buttercream. I’ll be uploading both recipes soon so stay tuned.
When frosting my cake layers, I like using an angled or offset spatula. I find
the angle of the spatula a lot easier to use than a straight icing spatula. I’ll
include a link in my description box below. I wanted this cake to be
really tall so I stacked five layers of cake making sure my last layer was added upside down. For my crumb coat, I like to start by putting the frosting on the top
and having it overflow off the sides. Make sure you’re putting frosting
between the gaps of the cake layers and no part of the cake is visible. You don’t
need a whole lot of frosting, just enough to secure the crumbs. I like to use my
large offset spatula to smooth out the sides as much as I can. This makes it
easier to smooth out your next layer of frosting. I scrape off the excess
frosting from the top and then pop the cake in the freezer for about 15 minutes.
When I add the final layer of frosting, I typically like to use a piping bag
because it helps me keep the amount of frosting consistent. This is a Wilton
789 tip. I like it a lot because I think it adds a perfect amount
of frosting. It also has a textured side as well for a different kind of look.
I’ll leave a link in the description box below. Using my small angled spatula I
fill in the gaps with extra frosting. I then smooth out the side
using my bench scraper. I continue this process until I’m fully satisfied with
my cake. Sometimes it can take upwards of 20 minutes. It’s important to be gentle and
to only remove a small amount of frosting at a time with the bench
scraper. I find a tighter angle between the bench scraper and the cake works
best. Also make sure you’re constantly cleaning off the excess frosting
otherwise you won’t get the desired look. If you want a more in-depth tutorial on
how I smooth out my sides comment below and let me know! To give that overflow
effect, I add a little mountain of frosting on the top of the cake. I smooth
it out at an angle to make it look like a spill. I then inserted the champagne
glass into the cake. My cake was very chilled so it was a little hard to get
it into the cake. I poured some ganache on the top of the cake. Using my small
angled spatula, I evenly spread it out. I couldn’t get some ganache in the very
back of the glass so I covered the back of the glass with some ganache.
Using a piping bag, I added the ganache drips. I wasn’t too particular about the
color since I would be painting the drips later on. Normally I slowly add the drips to create a more controlled look. For this
cake, I just went a little crazy since I wanted it to look like a spill.
Once the drips had set, I painted them champagne gold. I’m using edible paint
and food-safe brushes. Both will be linked in the description box below.
Painting the drips took a little longer than I expected. It also took more paint
than I expected but I was super in love with the look. For the narrower part of
the drips I used a smaller brush and switched to a larger one for the tops
of the drips. A full detailed blog post on how to recreate this super-fun New
Year’s cake is up on sugarplumsweettart.com And that’s a wrap! Thanks for
watching! If you like this video, please give it a thumbs up! If you want more
tutorials, hit the subscribe button. Until next time my Sugar Plum family!

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