How to make handspun yarns – How to make a two-ply yarn

How to make handspun yarns – How to make a two-ply yarn


Now let’s see how to create a 2 ply yarn. We will present the two easiest doable plying techniques. To proceed, we must have already spun our singles both clockwise, and still have an empty bobbin to wind the double yarn around. Place the bobbins on the lazy kate. Now let’s tie two ends of the spun yarn together, slip them into the loop of leader of the empty bobbin and tie a knot, start pedaling in the opposite direction, so anti-clockwise: you will notice immediately that the two yarns tend to ply together on their own. If we pedal at an even pace and not too fast, it gives us time to focus our attention on the position of our hands which must always stay possibly at the same distance. You will see that in this way the 2 ply yarn will be even. If we bring our hands closer, the angle of the doubling tightens and the singles form a spiral and without the right experience they risk detaching in some places. Conversely, if we move our hands further away the doubling angle widens a lot making the yarn hard. Spinning the singles in the opposite direction, we counteract the excess twist that was given to hold the fibres together initially; for this reason if the singles don’t have enough twist at this stage they will tend to unravel. Two-ply yarn is perfect for playing around with colour variations, and is easy to knit and crochet, giving the twist a versatile and harmonious effect. The second plying technique that we are going to present is obtained by matching a hand woven ply with a commercial one with a shape and thickness as desired. To start with let’s tie the 2 ply yarn and the handmade ply to the leader on the bobbin and tie a knot, start pedaling anticlockwise. Also in this case, the same rules apply for the angulation that we explained for the 2 ply yarn. Seen as usually the 2 ply yarns used are much thinner than the handmade ones, we need to pay attention to more detail unlike the doubling seen before. In this case the focus is on the strength that we hold our two ply: if we hold our 2 ply yarn more than the other yarn, we will see that the latter will tend to curl back on itself forming a spiry wavy yarn. However if we hold the handmade ply yarn and leave the 2 ply yarn free, we will see that this will wind with an irregular pace on the surface of the yarn and the final look will be smooth on the outside with a strong emphasis of the 2 ply yarn. So it’s a good idea to choose what look you want to give the yarn and keep to it throughout all the plying phase. This type of doubling, once mastered, allows you to create different types of yarn by playing with the colours and thickness. Once the plying is over, the work is still not completely finished. The first step is the formation of the skein: we will show you a portable, lightweight and a very used tool called “niddy noddy” which as you can see has a double T shape, offset by 90°. Place the bobbin on the lazy kate. Then we start putting the yarn on by winding it around each arm of the Ts, keeping to the outside and always in the same direction. In this way a ring of yarns is formed. Then we take off the ring by pushing it off one of the sides and here is the skein. Finally, to give shape to the skein just keep it tight in your hands in front of us and turn your left hand forward and your right hand backwards, moving them closer gradually as you rotate them, et violà, insert one end into the other and the skein is finally finished. We have got into a good habit of labelling the work with the materials used, the weight and the length and maybe keeping a sample of every yarn in a sort of personal catalogue, a bit for a memory and a bit as a useful reminder for future work. With this video I wanted to show you the first steps of artistic spinning and I hope I have aroused your curiosity. If you would like to continue this adventure you can find more interesting ideas on our website e land dates of the forthcoming courses.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *