How to Wash Your Clothes in a Plastic Bag While Traveling

How to Wash Your Clothes in a Plastic Bag While Traveling


Hi I’m Allison from Off the Blueprint and
in this video I’m going to attempt to demonstrate how I wash my clothes while on the road. I
pack a plastic bag as my laundry bag. I usually take the biggest Loksak bag in the bunch and
I’ve also used a regular Ziploc bag for this so you don’t have to go out and buy a Loksak
bag or anything. The Loksak bag does have better durability because it’s made to be
waterproof and it can also double as a vacuum-pack bag for your clothes when it’s dry (obviously).
So you just pack the bag, sit on it, and zip it up and you get this. So to start I put
my dirty laundry in the bag and I add some water. You can use water from the sink or
water from the shower you know if you’re showering in a hostel you could just multitask do both
at the same time. Then I add a few drops of Dr. Bronner’s soap which is great stuff, it’s
multi-purpose soap and you can use it for washing you and your clothes. Then I knead
the clothes for a few seconds. Afterwards I let it soak for as long as possible which
can be tricky if you’re using a sink in like a shared bathroom in a hostel so I try to
let it soak either while I’m showering or using the sink to brush my teeth or something.
But you should make sure the bag is stable or propped up because I have had it fall over
and flood everything which isn’t pleasant. Then once it’s done soaking I spill out the
water and rinse the clothes a little and squish out the water. You don’t want to like wring
them out but if you just squeeze it squeeze the sleeves if you have socks squeeze all
parts of the sock make sure any excess water is out. I usually have a towel either that
I rented or borrowed from my host and I roll the wet clothes in the towel and then you’re
supposed to step on it which is the best thing to do but often like I don’t want to put my
only towel on the floor so it also works to just smush it or bang it against the wall
just as long as you get some pressure on it. And then finally I just hang the clothes up
either on your bed frame or a closet. Sometimes if it hasn’t dried by morning and I’m in a
hostel room I’ll just stick it on a hook in my locker and hope that it’s well-vented.
I typically travel with synthetic or merino wool clothing so it dries relatively quickly
unless I’m in a super-humid place. And that’s it hope this helps.

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