Old Fashioned Baby Daydresses Pattern

Old Fashioned Baby Daydresses Pattern


Hey everyone, this is the daygown by Old Fashion
Baby. It’s a very easy pattern to put together
and lends itself to a range of sizing, too, since it only fits the baby around the neck
and shoulders. So when your little one grows a little bit
in their tummy or lengthwise, it doesn’t affect the fit much. Okay to begin, you’ll cut out two sleeves,
one back of the dress (which is done on the fold) and one front of the dress. In the video, I’m showing how to do view
3, but the pattern is so simple that it lends itself well to a range of embellishments – I’ll
show two other variations at the end of this video. Since I’m doing view 3, I copied the embroidery
and lace work with a water soluble pen. First I completed the embroidery work and
then it was time for lace-shaping. You’ll want to use lace that is straight
on both sides – this is called lace insertion. Since it’s straight on both sides, it’s
easy to sew and attach it to the fabric. So you’ll start pinning on the outside curve. Use lots of pins and give the lace a very
light tug as you’re shaping it. Very slight. Once you’ve done the outside curve, you’re
ready to shape the inside curve. This is done by pulling on the lace header. This is a piece of thread that has been woven
into the lace – it’s very similar to gathering fabric. You’ll take this piece of thread and carefully
pull on it. Like magic, the lace will lay down flat. I remember the first time I did this – I
thought it was the coolest thing since sliced bread. Carefully transfer your pins to laying flat. I did this lace shaping on my ironing board,
but you can also do it on a lace-shaping board. I have one that I love, and I link it below,
I didn’t use mine because it was in the other room and I was being lazy… let’s
be honest. So once you have your pens laying flat and
your work is loose, you can take the dress front to your machine. You’ll want to use a small zigzag that is
just wide enough to go from one side of the lace header to the other. Every machine is different, but my settings
were a 2.2 length and a 0.8 width. Start sewing on the outside curve, taking
your time, putting your needle down and turning as needed. Then repeat the same thing to the inside curve. Then you can spray some water to make the
blue marker lines disappear. Now onto the back of the dress – let’s
make the placket. This is a new way to make a placket for me
and I’ve fallen in love with it! It’s so much better than the continuous
placket method I’ve shown in other videos. Okay so to begin, you’ll cut a perpendicular
line to the dress down the middle of the dress about 6 inches long. And the right side of your dress should be
facing up. Then cut about 5/8” to the left side and
about 1/8” to the right side. As I’m trying to show, this placket is going
to fold on top of itself, right side over top left side. So you’ll want to sew the 1/8” side over
as I’m showing… or you could use a zigzag on that raw edge instead of turning it over
and sewing a straight stitch. I did that to the other variations that I’ll
be showing later in the video. Since the right side is going on top of the
left side, you can turn about 1/8” of an inch over on the right side, and then the
rest of the right side will cover up that raw edge… so you don’t need to do any
stitching here. I hope that’s making sense. I’m trying to show all angles of this placket
so the video can do a better job explaining than my words are – it’s really pretty
simple, I’m just not the best with words. So then I stitched a cross to secure the placket
in place, but on my second and third times making this garment, I just zigzagged the
bottom together and that held it in place without any visible stitches on the right
side and I like that a lot better. See what I mean? Once the placket is done, then attach the
front and back of the garment together with French seams. I have a video on how to do those linked below. Press those seams towards the back. I did a handful of basting stitches on the
top of the placket and then trimmed up the neckline so everything was in line in preparation
for the entredeux at the neckline. You’ll have to make little clippings in
the entredeux so it goes around the curve of the neckline. You can pin it in place if that helps you. Stitch in the ditch on the entredeux. Then you can trim that up to about an 1/8”
so you can zigzag the raw edges. Once you press that seam towards the garment,
you can trim up the other side of the entredeux to an 1/8” and zigzag the lace to it. Now onto the sleeves – to start, place two
rows of gather stitches along the bottom edge. Hey everyone, this is the daygown by Old Fashion
Baby. It’s a very easy pattern to put together and lends itself to a range of sizing, too,
since it only fits the baby around the neck and shoulders. So when your little one grows
a little bit in their tummy or lengthwise, it doesn’t affect the fit much. Okay to begin, you’ll cut out two sleeves,
one back of the dress (which is done on the fold) and one front of the dress. In the video,
I’m showing how to do view 3, but the pattern is so simple that it lends itself well to
a range of embellishments – I’ll show two other variations at the end of this video.
Since I’m doing view 3, I copied the embroidery and lace work with a water soluble pen. First
I completed the embroidery work and then it was time for lace-shaping.
You’ll want to use lace that is straight on both sides – this is called lace insertion.
Since it’s straight on both sides, it’s easy to sew and attach it to the fabric. So
you’ll start pinning on the outside curve. Use lots of pins and give the lace a very
light tug as you’re shaping it. Very slight. Once you’ve done the outside curve, you’re
ready to shape the inside curve. This is done by pulling on the lace header. This is a piece
of thread that has been woven into the lace – it’s very similar to gathering fabric.
You’ll take this piece of thread and carefully pull on it. Like magic, the lace will lay
down flat. I remember the first time I did this – I thought it was the coolest thing
since sliced bread. Carefully transfer your pins to laying flat.
I did this lace shaping on my ironing board, but you can also do it on a lace-shaping board.
I have one that I love, and I link it below, I didn’t use mine because it was in the
other room and I was being lazy… let’s be honest.
So once you have your pens laying flat and your work is loose, you can take the dress
front to your machine. You’ll want to use a small zigzag that is just wide enough to
go from one side of the lace header to the other. Every machine is different, but my
settings were a 2.2 length and a 0.8 width. Start sewing on the outside curve, taking
your time, putting your needle down and turning as needed. Then repeat the same thing to the
inside curve. Then you can spray some water to make the
blue marker lines disappear. Now onto the back of the dress – let’s
make the placket. This is a new way to make a placket for me and I’ve fallen in love
with it! It’s so much better than the continuous placket method I’ve shown in other videos.
Okay so to begin, you’ll cut a perpendicular line to the dress down the middle of the dress
about 6 inches long. And the right side of your dress should be facing up. Then cut about
5/8” to the left side and about 1/8” to the right side.
As I’m trying to show, this placket is going to fold on top of itself, right side over
top left side. So you’ll want to sew the 1/8” side over as I’m showing… or you
could use a zigzag on that raw edge instead of turning it over and sewing a straight stitch.
I did that to the other variations that I’ll be showing later in the video. Since the right
side is going on top of the left side, you can turn about 1/8” of an inch over on the
right side, and then the rest of the right side will cover up that raw edge… so you
don’t need to do any stitching here. I hope that’s making sense. I’m trying to show
all angles of this placket so the video can do a better job explaining than my words are
– it’s really pretty simple, I’m just not the best with words.
So then I stitched a cross to secure the placket in place, but on my second and third times
making this garment, I just zigzagged the bottom together and that held it in place
without any visible stitches on the right side and I like that a lot better. See what
I mean? Once the placket is done, then attach the
front and back of the garment together with French seams. I have a video on how to do
those linked below. Press those seams towards the back.
I did a handful of basting stitches on the top of the placket and then trimmed up the
neckline so everything was in line in preparation for the entredeux at the neckline.
You’ll have to make little clippings in the entredeux so it goes around the curve
of the neckline. You can pin it in place if that helps you. Stitch in the ditch on the
entredeux. Then you can trim that up to about an 1/8” so you can zigzag the raw edges.
Once you press that seam towards the garment, you can trim up the other side of the entredeux
to an 1/8” and zigzag the lace to it. Now onto the sleeves – to start, place two
rows of gather stitches along the bottom edge. Pull the gather threads until they measure
7 ½” long. I cut two pieces of entredeux to that length. Pin the entredeux to the bottom
of the sleeve, adjusting the gathers as you go.
You’re going to repeat the same process to attach the entredeux to the sleeve, however,
you’ll have to do two straight stitches right next to each other – 1/16” apart
– due to the gathered fabric. Then zigzag like normal.
Press the seam toward the sleeve and then trim the other side of the entredeux in preparation
for the lace. As you did before, zigzag the lace to the entredeux. Something to note is
that I don’t think it matters if your zigzag goes from the raw edge to inside the holes
of the entredeux or if it’s just from the raw edge to the outside of the holes. I did
it both ways and they look pretty similar. Put two rows of gather stitches on the top
of the sleeve between the dots shown on the pattern. Adjust those gathers so they fit
the armhole. I like to pin each side first, then find the middle of the sleeve and pin
that to the shoulder seam, and adjust the two spots on either side until the gathers
fit. Then stitch the sleeve in place. Trim that
seam down to about ¼” and zigzag those raw edges. Press that seam toward the sleeve.
Now you can join one side seam using a French seam. You only want to join one side if you’re
putting lace on the bottom of the garment… that way the raw edges of the lace can be
enclosed with the French seam on the other side.
To prepare for lace or entredeux on the bottom, first cut any stray threads away. Then stitch
the entredeux as shown before in the video and trim the seam to an 1/8”. Zigzag that
seam and press it towards the dress. Trim the other side and zigzag the lace to it.
Press that seam towards the lace. To finish the garment construction, join the
other side using a French seam. Now you’ll just have to hand stitch the
ends of the lace at the neckline in place as well as add a snap or button to the top
of the placket. Here’s Audrey in this dress. The pattern
says the small size is good from birth until 16 lbs and I can see how that would be true
since it only fits the baby around their shoulders and neck, which doesn’t change too much.
I also made a Christmas version using velvet and English netting. I decided to go without
the sleeves and instead put bias strips to finish those edges.
Then I also made a silk dupioni version with lots of entredeux. I guess this
could also be a Christmas dress or maybe a fancy Thanksgiving dress for photos. Anywho,
it’s another take on the pattern. I hope this was helpful. If
you have any questions, just leave them in the comments below and I’ll do my best to
answer them. As always, I thank y’all for watching and I hope to catch you next time.

24 thoughts on “Old Fashioned Baby Daydresses Pattern

  1. I always learn something (or several somethings) from your tutorials! They really are clear and you have a talent for descriptions.

    As beautiful as your dresses are, Audrey is your true masterpiece! I can't believe she is already smiling.

  2. Congratulations on your baby ,she is adorable ! All you do is just beautiful ,I am living in Argentina ,I don't know how to sew ,but now with a brand new grand-daughter ,I am willing to start .Maybe I am too old to start ,I have always loved this European style .I am going to see if I can get a very simple pattern ,Thank u for all u share !

  3. Hello. When you do the embroidery do you line the fabric in the back or just embroider right on the fabric. I'm using imperial batiste for my first dress project. Thanks!

  4. Thank you for the tutorials Sara.  Your baby is a dream come true. Where you but the fabrics and laces.

  5. Mi deseo es aprender estoy intentando hacer un bestidito de peto o corpino redondo pero no se como se calcula la tela para uno de 3 anos y como no hablo ingles no entiendo los videos y me desespero pues hace bestiditos muy hermosos

  6. عمل روعه ولكن اتمنى ان تضعي لنا المقاسات بالتفصيل شكرا

  7. Hi, Do you by any chance make and sell your dresses? I'm in Australia, and have anew grand-daughter due at the end of August 2018. Jeannine

  8. I can't find a dress like this one for my baby, and I don't have a lot of experience sewing to make it myself! 🙁
    It's a beautiful work! Thanks for sharing

  9. Hello there, Wonder Woman Sarah! I love watching your perfection in action. You are truly gifted – some call it 'skilled' – perhaps the best adjective here is blessed, because you bring a passion to everything you do and that is is a blessing for sure! 😊

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