Petit Pli: Clothes That Grow | DIF

Petit Pli: Clothes That Grow | DIF


My name is Ryan Mario Yasin,
and I am founder of Petit Pli, clothes that grow with your
child. We create garments that grow through seven discreet sizes, to mitigate the amount of waste that children are creating through the clothes that they wear. As well as raising a future generation that has better consumption
values. The main problem that Petit Pli is aiming to tackle is overconsumption and waste of clothing. Did you know that the best way of reaching our water waste and carbon emission targets by 2030, is actually to reduce consumption of our clothing that we have today and increase the utilization of the clothing that we buy. So if we can do anything to increase the utilization of the garments that we buy, then we will be shifting towards a much more sustainable way of consuming goods. So the starting point of Petit Pli was mapping out the entire fashion industry, from crops to point of sale and finding out where I could leverage my own technical skills as a aeronautical engineer and a designer, to pinpoint problems and pinpoint ways that I could use my skills to solve those problems. So I identified six ways in which I could tackle small parts of the entire fashion industry and after time I distilled that into one main project which was called Petit Pli, clothes that grow. Petit Pli achieves this by first scrapping everything and then designing from the ground up. So the way Petit Pli works is that there’s a structure embedded within the garment that exhibits a negative Poisson’s ratio and what that means is as you pull the material along its length it grows along its width. Typically materials will shrink as you pull them along their length. And the reason why this is so important is because this is the key thing that allows us to create clothes that mimic the direction of growth of the anatomy of a child. We realized that children’s
anatomies are so different to adults, so why would we miniaturize clothes for their bodies. Petit Pli is also championing innovation within the fashion industry, rather than trying to cut costs everywhere. We’re trying to see how we can leverage technology but create a product that offers longevity to give customers a more advanced product with better fabrics, using ripstop technology to increase strength, DWR coatings to increase water resistance, and breathable sports technical fabrics. And we’re packaging that in a garment that doesn’t last two months, but is designed to last two years or more. So in that sense we’re creating more sustainable designs at a price point where we can compete with other high street brands over the longevity of the life of the garment. So we’re building everything
from a materials library to testing rigs so that we can actually test our own innovation, and through this we’re building a deeper and deeper understanding to help inform the products of the future. Looking into the future, Petit Pli never started by looking at just children’s work. We started by looking for problems to solve within the fashion industry and we’re going to continue to do that with every single product that we’re designing. We want everything that comes out of Petit Pli to actually benefit someone’s life in some way or another. But it doesn’t matter who the stakeholder is, if we can use our skills to solve a problem in a certain sector using the most intimate products that we earn, then we’ll be there. So for Petit Pli problem solving is key to what we do. We are rehashing styles. What we’re doing is looking
for problems and designing solutions for those problems which we can share with the world. Every single piece of design
that comes out of this company is going to be beneficial to someone’s life in some form or another, and will stay true to the core values of the company. What we’re trying
to do is clear the future of humanity and we’re just starting with the next
generation. [Music]

3 thoughts on “Petit Pli: Clothes That Grow | DIF

  1. Interesting approach and good idea. Ive often wondered why there is not an organization that focuses on trading childrens clothes from family to family.

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